What Happens to Lavender in Winter?

Nicknamed “Blue Gold” because of its color, lavender has been growing naturally in Provence for 2,000 years. Fragrant, covered in flowers and ubiquitous throughout Provence landscapes during the summer, it also adapts perfectly to the winter, a period during which it patiently waits for the next period of summer flowering...
By Justine Fiordelli

A member of the Lamiaceae family of flowering plants, lavender is highly regarded for its unique fragrance, that smells just like Provence! Renowned for its many virtues, it is used in various fields: medicine, food, aromatherapy, and even cosmetics! The secret? Its essential oil, obtained by distillation, has “incredible soothing, healing and anti-bacterial powers,” explains Eric Chaisse, director of the CRIEPPAM, a research center specializing in perfumed, medicinal and aromatic plants, located in Manosque.

If it blooms in summer, between July and August, it holds the distinction of being easy to grow and maintain. Very resistant to cold – unlike lavendin, the natural hybrid variety crossed with Spike lavender and grown at low altitude – it also adapts perfectly to the winter and likes to find itself in Provence’s dry and sunny mountains, a terrain favorable to its health, like all deep and stony grounds. On the snowy plains, thick layers of snow serve as a shell, allowing it to protect itself from freezing temperatures.

Almost invulnerable, it should however be noted that lavender has some weaknesses, including an intolerance to water when present in large quantities.

What Happens to Lavender in Winter?
What Happens to Lavender in Winter?
Lavender fields snow-covered
Fotolia
What Happens to Lavender in Winter?
What Happens to Lavender in Winter?
Lavender in winter
Fotolia

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